News

Help my Campaign for the 26 March Election

I appreciate the support of volunteers who are already working in my election campaign office now open at 65-67 Foveaux Street, Surry Hills.Unlike the major parties, I don't accept donations from developers or large corporate donations and I rely on hundreds of volunteers to help with doorknocking, street stalls, envelope stuffing, distributing leaflets and helping out on election day. Whether it's a few hours on election day, or a few days each week before the election, any time you can spare will help. We provide plenty of support and volunteers have fun talking to residents and catching up with other like-minded Independent supporters.If you have some spare hours to work in the campaign office or to help in other ways please contact the office on 9211 3476 or via email at campaign2011@clovermoore.com

First City Talks For 2011 with Cate Blanchett and Andrew Upton

The Co-Artistic Directors of Sydney Theatre Company, Cate Blanchett and Andrew Upton, will share their ideas on fostering a green and vibrant cultural precinct at Walsh Bay in the first City Talk for 2011 on Tuesday 8 March at Sydney Town Hall.The Sydney Theatre Company's Greening The Wharf project, provides an excellent case study that all buildings, including iconic heritage ones, can be made more sustainable. The company have installed the nation's second largest capacity roof-top solar energy system so that Pier 4/5 Walsh Bay now gets most of its energy from renewable sources. A rainwater harvesting system is being installed to provide all of the building's non-potable water.After the presentation from Cate and Andrew, they will join me on a panel discussion with me, Craig Allchin, Director, Six Degrees Architects, Lisa Havilah CEO, CarriageWorks, Rafael Bonachela Artistic Director, Sydney Dance Company to discuss the essential elements to build creative, vibrant and sustainable cultural precincts, and consider examples from around the world.CityTalks are free but bookings are essential. City Talk Sydney: creative, vibrant, sustainable: Tuesday 8 March, Sydney Town Hall beginning at 6.30pm. Bookings: City Recital Hall Angel Place Box Office on 02 8256 2222 or www.cityrecitalhall.com

CBD Veggie Patches Show Us How It's Done

The City's commitment to promoting sustainable fresh food will continue over the next eight weeks with Live Green vegetable gardens appearing in 10 different locations throughout the City centre.The gardens will demonstrate how fresh produce such as corn, tomatoes and eggplants can be successfully grown in pots in the inner city.Growing your own vegetables is an enjoyable, cost effective and sustainable way to help reduce the carbon emissions, water and energy used to produce and deliver food. Australia's food supply chain, from production to distribution, produces 23 per cent of the country's total greenhouse gas emissions.If you're uncertain about growing food at home, there are 15 community gardens across the City where you can learn hands-on and, grow your own fresh, organic food while meeting other local residents.The City will work with community gardeners to harvest and distribute the fresh vegetables grown in the City veggie patches, and when the display is finsihed the plants will be donated to community gardens and local schools. Information 'Live Green' vegetable patch display locations: QVB Forecourt, Town Hall Square; Martin Place; Cathedral Square; Green Square; Hyde Park Barracks, Hyde Park South, Ian Thorpe Aquatic Centre, Ultimo; Customs House Square, AMP Forecourt and Alfred Street, Circular Quay and Darlinghurst Road - Greenwall 2. Growing food in the inner city: More information here Community gardens: More information here

Minister Denies Community Voices on Late Night Violence

Late on Thursday night, the Minister for Planning recklessly ordered the City to halt community consultation about our plan to strengthen planning controls for licensed venues with a record of violence and poor management. To do this he changed the law, giving him the power to block consultation.He has directed the City to revoke the recent improvements to our Late Night Trading Development Control Plan by 3 March, one day before the government switches into caretaker mode. If Council does not comply, the Minister can act himself, under the sudden changes he made to the Environment and Planning Assessment Regulation.Our improvements were small and simple and included allowing police research and data to be used when deciding whether or not to approve extended trading hours. They were strongly supported by the Police Association, Nurses Association and the Australian Medical Association.This latest action proves the Government's continuing contempt for the people of Sydney and the amenity of inner city residents who live near late night venues. The Minister is only listening to those involved in the liquor industry and is turning a blind eye to violent and antisocial behaviour.Allowing irresponsible venues which breed anti-social behaviour is the opposite of what you would expect to see in a global city.We deserve more than a violent, alcohol-fuelled late night culture. We should have a diverse range of night time options and not just beer barns that serve alcohol and provide gambling, offering little else.Sydney should be a city where you can shop, see an art exhibition, browse in a bookstore, pop into a bar to listen to live music and round it off with supper and a late night movie or show.Late night culture in Sydney is slowly changing and our reputation is growing as a city with quirky small bars, contemporary dining and vibrant culture. Since I introduced legislation which led to new licensing laws to encourage small bars, more than 35 have opened in the City, with many more in wider Sydney. I have recently given interviews about Sydney's changing night life to the New York's Financial Times and the cult magazine Monocole.On Monday evening Council supported my call to accelerate work on a coordinated approach to the City's Late Night Economy. We aim to attract a wider range of people into the city centre, not just people who want to drink excessively and provoke violence. Our new approach will cover everything from better transport options and late night shopping and cultural activities, to safer streets, pubs and clubs.People need to have choices when they head out at night. Having more options - that do not involve alcohol - will create a safer and more balanced late night economy.Recently, I joined many others at the Art Gallery of NSW which opened until midnight for Chinese New Year celebrations and showed just how successful night trading can be. This summer, the Australian Museum is opening its doors every Tuesday evening for after-hour sessions featuring art, live music, drinks and dancing.We're also continuing to improve safety for people out late at night with initiatives including hiring late night "Precinct Ambassadors" on George Street, trialling new signs to help people find transport and public toilets and improving the Bayswater Road secure taxi rank in Kings Cross.We'll continue to work with the Government, venue operators, police, residents, and patrons to balance vibrant night life with residential amenity and safety.I encourage you to write to the Minister for Planning to tell him what you think about his move to block community consultation on violent and antisocial behaviour on our city streets.Information Contact the Minister for Planning by sending an email ATTN: MINISTER FOR PLANNING TONY KELLY to planning@lpma.nsw.gov.au or calling his office on (02) 9228 3999. City action on the late night economy: www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/Business/CityEconomy/LateNightTrading.asp Related information: | City Economy | Policing & Safety | eNews |

Making City Spaces More Welcoming

A month long trial to make some City public spaces more people friendly will begin on Monday. We will provide chairs, tables and deck chairs were people can relax, read, meet friends and enjoy the late summer weather in Sydney Square, next to Town Hall and in Barrack Street, between York Street and George Street, near Wynyard Station. We'll also provide free public WiFi in Sydney Square. Barrack Street will operate from 11am to 3pm on weekdays and Sydney Square will operate 24 hours per day from 7am on Sundays until 10pm on Thursdays and from 7am to 10pm on Fridays and Saturdays. Barrack Street will be closed to traffic for the duration of the trial, which ends on 18 March. The trial is inspired by last year's visit and City Talk by Janette Sadik-Khan, New York's Transportation Commissioner, who has transformed streets and parks across her City.Information Janette Sadik-Khan City Talk: www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/podcasts/citytalks/default/default.aspRelated information: | Environment | Open Space & Recreation | eNews

Voting in 2011

Mark 26 March 2011 in your diary as election day. You can be fined if you are enrolled and do not vote.Check your enrolment online at the Australian Electoral Commission and update details there. You can also get enrolment forms from Post Offices, Medicare, Centrelink or Australian Taxation Office offices, or call my Electorate Office for a copy.You can make a postal vote if you will be away or unable to vote on election day and I encourage you to apply now for a postal vote if you need one.You can also vote before election day in person at pre-poll centres from Monday 14 March until 6pm on Friday 25 March. The pre-poll centres for the Sydney electorate are the Marconi Room at Town Hall and the State Electoral Commission office Level 2, 201 Kent Street Sydney.Information Electoral Commission phone 1300 135 736 or aec.gov.au Postal vote applications, enrolment changes and polling place maps: www.votensw.info Related information: | Informing and Involving | Working for Sydney | eNews

Support for Mardi Gras

The annual Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras celebrations are a highlight in my calendar.Yesterday morning I again raised the Rainbow Flag at Town Hall to mark the beginning of Mardi Gras, following the successful inaugural flag raising last year.This month marks the 40th anniversary of the first meeting of lesbians and gay men held in Australia. Held in a Balmain church hall, around 50 people at that meeting agreed to establish the Campaign Against Moral Persecution or CAMP, giving birth to Australia's gay and lesbian movement.I was honoured to see some of the people who attended that first meeting join us for the flag raising.My involvement with Mardi Gras dates back to 1986 when I was invited to be a parade judge. I subsequently judged the costume parade and in my first year as Bligh MP I was invited to launch the 1989 Mardi Gras Festival. This year will be my 19th Parade since I first took part as the only Member of the Legislative Assembly in the parliamentary group that marched for the first time in 1992.I look forward to once again joining my gay and lesbian friends at Mardi Gras Fair Day on Sunday and in the Parade on Saturday 5 March.In keeping with this year's theme "Don't Just stand there. Say Something..." my parade entry will "say something" about the need for relationship equality for same-sex couples. Join me to show your support for all families having the same chance to be legally recognised, but get in quick as there are only a few spaces left in my parade group.I continue support my for Mardi Gras in and outside parliament. When Mardi Gras was under attack from conservatives and homophobes I tabled petitions supporting Mardi Gras on every Parliamentary sitting day.I strongly supported Mardi Gras' request to be considered a hallmark event and to be exempt from charges which government agencies wanted to impose for staging the annual Parade.The City provides significant ongoing financial support for Mardi Gras and has formally recognised it as a major festival. In 2008 Council unanimously endorsed my recommendation to request the NSW Government to help fund Mardi Gras to ensure that it remains a sustainable and exciting event.Events NSW subsequently provided funding for Mardi Gras for three years, with the current arrangements due to expire following the 2011 Mardi Gras. If I am re-elected, I will encourage the incoming government to continue this support.InformationContact Leanne Abbott, phone 9360 3053 or email sydney@parliament.nsw.gov.au Related information: | Gay & Lesbian | Informing and Involving | eNews

Minister Denies Community Voices on Late Night Violence

Late on Thursday night, the Minister for Planning recklessly ordered the City to halt community consultation about our plan to strengthen planning controls for licensed venues with a record of violence and poor management. To do this he changed the law, giving him the power to block consultation.He has directed the City to revoke the recent improvements to our Late Night Trading Development Control Plan by 3 March, one day before the government switches into caretaker mode. If Council does not comply, the Minister can act himself, under the sudden changes he made to the Environment and Planning Assessment Regulation.Our improvements were small and simple and included allowing police research and data to be used when deciding whether or not to approve extended trading hours. They were strongly supported by the Police Association, Nurses Association and the Australian Medical Association.This latest action proves the Government's continuing contempt for the people of Sydney and the amenity of inner city residents who live near late night venues. The Minister is only listening to those involved in the liquor industry and is turning a blind eye to violent and antisocial behaviour.Allowing irresponsible venues which breed anti-social behaviour is the opposite of what you would expect to see in a global city.We deserve more than a violent, alcohol-fuelled late night culture. We should have a diverse range of night time options and not just beer barns that serve alcohol and provide gambling, offering little else.Sydney should be a city where you can shop, see an art exhibition, browse in a bookstore, pop into a bar to listen to live music and round it off with supper and a late night movie or show.Late night culture in Sydney is slowly changing and our reputation is growing as a city with quirky small bars, contemporary dining and vibrant culture. Since I introduced legislation which led to new licensing laws to encourage small bars, more than 35 have opened in the City, with many more in wider Sydney. I have recently given interviews about Sydney's changing night life to the New York's Financial Times and the cult magazine Monocole.On Monday evening Council supported my call to accelerate work on a coordinated approach to the City's Late Night Economy. We aim to attract a wider range of people into the city centre, not just people who want to drink excessively and provoke violence. Our new approach will cover everything from better transport options and late night shopping and cultural activities, to safer streets, pubs and clubs.People need to have choices when they head out at night. Having more options - that do not involve alcohol - will create a safer and more balanced late night economy.Recently, I joined many others at the Art Gallery of NSW which opened until midnight for Chinese New Year celebrations and showed just how successful night trading can be. This summer, the Australian Museum is opening its doors every Tuesday evening for after-hour sessions featuring art, live music, drinks and dancing.We're also continuing to improve safety for people out late at night with initiatives including hiring late night "Precinct Ambassadors" on George Street, trialling new signs to help people find transport and public toilets and improving the Bayswater Road secure taxi rank in Kings Cross.We'll continue to work with the Government, venue operators, police, residents, and patrons to balance vibrant night life with residential amenity and safety.I encourage you to write to the Minister for Planning to tell him what you think about his move to block community consultation on violent and antisocial behaviour on our city streets.Information Contact the Minister for Planning by sending an email ATTN: MINISTER FOR PLANNING TONY KELLY to planning@lpma.nsw.gov.au or calling his office on (02) 9228 3999. City action on the late night economy: www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/Business/CityEconomy/LateNightTrading.asp Related information: | City Economy | Policing & Safety | eNews |

Planning for a More Liveable Sydney

The City's draft City Plan, a set of comprehensive planning controls for the City of Sydney, is now on exhibition. The draft Plan consolidates and standardises multiple changes to the controls following boundary changes and amalgamations as well as changes to State Government templates and legislation.The City Plan is made up of a Local Environmental Plan (LEP) and a Development Control Plan (DCP). The LEP is a statutory Planning Instrument which outlines key land use and built form standards including zoning, height, floor space ratio (FSR), heritage and on-site parking provisions. The DCP is a more flexible policy document that accompanies the LEP and includes detailed controls for urban form, amenity, the public domain, environment and sustainability.The draft City Plan now on exhibition is the culmination of several years of research, urban planning studies, reviews and public consultation. It is guided by the City and State Government's major strategic directions including Sustainable Sydney 2030 and the Metropolitan Subregional Strategy.The draft Plan encourages high quality sustainable development, essential for the vitality, liveability and culture of our city. It balances the need for new development to meet the NSW Government's targets for new homes and jobs with the City's own goal to be green, global and connected city by 2030.It will encourage sustainable and responsible development in key growth areas such as Green Square while protecting the character of Sydney's important heritage areas and villages like Glebe, Millers Point and Paddington.Following representations from landowners, the Department of Planning directed the City to make changes to our preferred Floor Space Ratio (FSR) and building heights for specific sites in Glebe, Darlinghurst, Sydney, Erskineville, Waterloo and Redfern.One of the key concerns the City has is a significant increase in FSR and building heights at 57 Ashmore Street and 165-175 Mitchell Road, Erskineville. The Department's revisions propose increased density and building heights up to 19 storeys or 60 metres - our maximum was up 9 storeys or 35 metres.Given the scale of the changes, City staff will undertake a detailed analysis including reviews of the impacts on overshadowing, traffic, amenity, neighbourhood character, stormwater management and regional views.The public exhibition period includes information sessions in the Lower Town Hall from 21 to 25 February, where you can talk with expert City staff, ask questions and give your feedback. The draft City Plan is on exhibition until Monday 4 April.The City of Sydney takes its planning responsibilities seriously. City staff, Councillors and Central Sydney Planning Committee members have worked hard to streamline our development assessment processes, review all aspects of our strategic planning, and comply with State government legislation, regulation and circulars.Our Development Application (DA) processing times continue to be better than the State average. This is a huge achievement, as the City processes more DAs and Complying Development Certificates than any other Council in NSW.Our input into State Government planning for the renewal of key sites at Chippendale, Green Square, Barangaroo and North Eveleigh resulted in better public consultation, more informed debate and developer commitments to design excellence and sustainability.The City will continue to ensure that our community benefits from the renewal of our city - not just developers.Information Copies of the City Plan documents, fact sheets and background reports, as well as details of upcoming information sessions and information on how to make a submission can viewed on City Plan website at: www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/Development/CityPlan/Default.asp

Follow My Tweets

Over the past few weeks Twitter has been a focus in the downfall of governments from Egypt to Tunisia, it is credited with helping advocacy networks around the world work more effectively and it seems that every celebrity is 'tweeting' their way to infamy.I've been 'tweeting' in recent months to keep people up to date with my work at a local and state level and to hear what people think. I encourage you to follow my tweets and have your say on the issues that are important to you.Twitter is a free 'micro-blogging' site, where people post short messages for hundreds, thousands, or even millions of people to read. It is now often where news breaks first and I have enjoyed following local and national news sources, local residents, community groups and businesses and interesting commentators and opinion makers.If you haven't joined the social media revolution, you may like to start by signing up to Twitter. Go to www.twitter.com to sign up and search for 'CloverMoore' (no space) to follow me. Don't worry if you're not familiar with the technology - twitter provides a helpful introductory video.Information www.twitter.com Related information: | Informing and Involving | eNews |

Sustainable Bio-Fuels to Power the City's Fleet

The City will soon have a new supply of certified, sustainable bio-fuel for our vehicle fleet, subject to Council's approval of a tender on Monday night.Following an open Expression of Interest and Tender process, Council's Corporate, Finance, Properties and Tenders Committee unanimously endorsed a recommended supplier. If approved, the supplier will be responsible for the supply, installation and management of two 20,000 litre fuel storage tanks and fuel, to be installed at the City's Epsom Road and Bay Street Depots.The City currently has 450 vehicles and plant items that use over 1 million litres of fuel annually, emitting approximately 3,000 tonnes/year of carbon dioxide. Two thirds of these vehicles are diesel powered. Using sustainable bio-fuels rather than mineral diesel could achieve emission reductions of up to 26% in these vehicles, contributing to our Sustainable Sydney 2030 target of reducing fleet emissions by 20% by 2014.The City first began using sustainable bio-fuels blended from South Australian canola crop waste, recycled cooking oils and tallow in 2006. In 2008, the supplier replaced the bio-oil component with Malaysian Palm Oil - a product that is known to contribute to land clearing, habitat destruction and the increased cost of food in developing countries.We have since relied on standard mineral diesel to run our plant and vehicles, until new suppliers entered the biofuels market last year, when we sought expressions of interest.InformationReport to Committee: www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/Council/documents/meet...

Chinese New Year Festival Concludes This Weekend

The City's 15th Chinese New Year Festival concludes this weekend with spectacular Dragon Boat Races on Cockle Bay, Darling Harbour. Twelve metre long boats, decorated to feature a dragon head and tail, seat up to 22 people who paddle to drumbeats as they compete to reach the finish line first. Thousands of people are expected to line the harbour to watch over 3000 people take part in the races throughout the day.The final weekend of the Festival also features live performances, films, exhibitions, talks, tours and the Australian Chinese Community Association's Chinese New Year Banquet.Several exhibitions featuring in the Festival program will continue beyond Sunday. They include The First Emperor: China's Entombed Warriors and Homage to the Ancestors: Ritual Art from the Ancient Chu Kingdom, both at the Art Gallery of NSW. Homage to Ancestors, which I welcomed to the Art Gallery on Wednesday, is being presented in conjunction with the Chinese government and Hubei province. Over 250 people from Hubei have travelled to Sydney to take part in our Chinese New Year celebrations. The exhibition features bronze vessels, lacquer wares, jades and bronze bells from the Hubei Provincial Museum.Information Chinese New Year Festival: Until 13 February: www.sydneychinesenewyear.com.au Dragon Boat Races, Saturday 12 and Sunday13 February, 8am to 5pm, Cockle Bay, Darling Harbour The First Emperor: China's Entombed Warriors: Art Gallery of NSW until Sunday 13 March. Homage to the Ancestors: Ritual Art from the Ancient Chu Kingdom: Art Gallery of NSW until Tuesday 26 April. Exhibition information: www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/ Related information: | Arts & Culture | eNews

Sign Up